Saturday, December 15, 2018

Diet for constipation in Indian children - tips by a pediatrician Diet for constipation in Indian children - tips by a pediatrician

Diet for constipation in Indian children - tips by a pediatrician https://youtu.be/5Sz5pj6vN-U Charak Child Care

Diet for constipation in Indian children - tips by a pediatrician


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Diet for constipation in Indian children - tips by a pediatrician

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Diet for cold & cough in Indian babies


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Diet for cold & cough in Indian babies Diet for cold & cough in Indian babies

Pediatrician's tips and suggestions for Diet for cold & cough in Indian babies https://youtu.be/lFBcQkh7Rns Charak Child Care

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Diet for Diarrhea or Loose motions in Indian Children - suggestions by a pediatrician


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Diet for Diarrhea or Loose motions in Indian Children - suggestions by a pediatrician Diet for Diarrhea or Loose motions in Indian Children - suggestions by a pediatrician

Diet for Diarrhea or Loose motions in Indian Children - suggestions by a pediatrician with inputs from a dietitian BRAT diet with Banana, Rice Apple Bread curd etc. Increased fluids, ORS etc. https://youtu.be/RKcg_dMbFKM Charak Child Care

Friday, November 16, 2018

Five types of Sounds made by newborn babies that tell us if they are hungry or have gas etc. Five types of Sounds made by newborn babies that tell us if they are hungry or have gas etc.

Five types of Sounds made by newborn babies that tell us if they are hungry or have gas etc. as shown on TV - Personally as a pediatrician I am not sure that this is accurate, but it may help mothers cue in to their infants needs https://youtu.be/jJuw3mdKBJY Charak Child Care

Five types of Sounds made by newborn babies that tell us if they are hungry or have gas etc.


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Monday, October 22, 2018

Blocked NLD massage, Baby having tears, blocked nasal / tear duct - how to massage baby's eyes Blocked NLD massage, Baby having tears, blocked nasal / tear duct - how to massage baby's eyes

Blocked NLD massage, Baby having tears, blocked nasal / tear duct - how to massage baby's eyes, as suggested by a Pediatrician and Ophthalmologist (Eye doctor) as well. https://youtu.be/Kb2k9WKup_s Charak Child Care

Blocked NLD massage, Baby having tears, blocked nasal / tear duct - how to massage baby's eyes


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Thursday, October 04, 2018

A new drug may help treat Ebola, Yellow Fever & even ZIKA virus

A Durham pharmaceutical company has received $3.5 million from a federal agency to support clinical trials for a drug to treat people with yellow fever.

For BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, the latest funds from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) for galidesivir brings development contract funding to a total of $43 million.  

BioCryst saw success during its Phase 1 trials; healthy patients tolerated the drug and found it to be safe. In animal studies, galidesivir showed benefits against several viruses, including Ebola, yellow fever and Zika.

Severe cases of yellow fever lead to fatal heart, liver and kidney conditions. The disease is particularly serious in tropical areas of Africa and Central and South America, responsible for 170,000 severe cases and up to 60,000 deaths annually, according to the World Health Organization. Currently, there is no approved treatment for the disease. 

Brazil in particular faces serious issues with the disease. Seasonal outbreaks have put more than 35 million people at risk, and the Brazilian Ministry of Health has confirmed 2,043 cases and 676 deaths from yellow fever since December 2016. 

The galidesivir development program project has been funded by the NIAID – part of the National Institutes of Health – and Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, which is part of the Department of Health and Human Service’s Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness Response.  




Concerns about 'tainted' Oral Polio Vaccine in India - how bad is the situation for an individual parent?

MUMBAI (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday that there was minimal risk of children contracting the polio virus in India from a tainted batch of vaccines.
The public health scare, which potentially affected thousands of children, put a renewed spotlight on lax pharmaceutical quality control procedures in India.
The latest concerns emerged over the weekend after vaccines produced by privately-held Bio-Med Pvt Ltd and distributed as part of a free government drive to eradicate polio were found to have a strain of the virus that had been eradicated around the world and phased out of vaccines.
However Shamila Sharma, a spokeswoman for the WHO, said any risk to children was "minimal" due to the high routine polio immunization coverage in India. The WHO funds and supports India's polio-control program.
Health officials in New Delhi said they were investigating why and how Bio-Med was still producing such vaccines, and that the affected lots were being recalled. The Indian government had ordered this type of vaccine to be discontinued in 2016.
Local media reported on the weekend that police arrested the managing director of the northern India-based Bio-Med Pvt Ltd, after routine testing revealed it had made and shipped some 150,000 lots of oral polio vaccines that contained the type 2 polio vaccine virus.
India, often dubbed the pharmacy of the world, is home to thousands of factories churning out drugs and vaccines for sale globally, but local regulation is lax. In recent years, U.S. and European regulators have slammed many Indian drug factories for faulty manufacturing practices, often issuing warnings or bans.
"We don't have good quality control mechanisms," said Oommen Kurian, a health researcher at New Delhi-based Observer Research Foundation, adding the country also doesn't have the capacity to implement regulation.
Bio-Med and India's top drugs regulator, the Central Drug Standard Control Organization, did not respond to requests for comment on Monday.
Some batches of typhoid vaccines produced by Bio-Med were also found to be "not-of standard quality" by the CDSCO earlier this year, according to a public notice by the agency dated March 14, 2018.
Reuters Health Information © 2018 
Cite this article: WHO Plays Down Risk to Indian Children From Tainted Polio Vaccine - Medscape - Oct 01, 2018.
My take on this: 
What all this basically means is the following
1. One company supplying to the govt has been found to be making vaccine that is the same as what was being given to all children before 2016 - for example my daughter got this vaccine when she was a child.
2. This is NOT a cause of significant concern for any child who has received IPV (Injectable Polio vaccine) OR for any child who has received the 'contaminated' vaccine as well.

Why the govt is concerned is for a different reason - it can lead to the spread of the virus in the community - but this would NOT be very relevant to any child who has taken the 'contaminated' vaccine & especially if they have taken the IPV as well.

    Friday, September 07, 2018

    Hi Dr. 
    I have the imo certificate which was issued to me 10 years back when i got yellow fever vaccination. Now this vaccine is valid for lifetime. So where can i get this lifetime validity stamped on my existing certificate. I am from Chandigarh. Pls suggest any nearest centre.

    Ans:
    Great Question,
    The answer is - NO changes are needed to the certificate,
    IN FACT - any changes to the certificate will make it INVALID.
    As per WHO guidelines the SAME certificate will remain VALID for LIFE,
    We have a center in Mohali if you need any clarifications,
    Warm regards
    Dr. Gaurav Gupta, Travel Vaccination Expert Doctor, Immunization Specialist

    Friday, August 31, 2018

    Nappy rash or diaper rash in children


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    Nappy rash or diaper rash in children Nappy rash or diaper rash in children

    Nappy rash or diaper rash in children, why it happens and how to prevent and treat it https://youtu.be/jIpGOQaUSy8 Charak Child Care

    Saturday, August 18, 2018

    Toys and activities for babies Toys and activities for babies

    How to choose good activities and toys for babies, A doctor from India gives a few helpful tips & suggestions https://youtu.be/J-G1to-Pqws Charak Child Care

    Toys and activities for babies


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    Friday, August 10, 2018

    Poor appetite in babies - Mera baccha kuch khata nahin !


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    Poor appetite in babies - Mera baccha kuch khata nahin ! Poor appetite in babies - Mera baccha kuch khata nahin !

    The most common complaint of ALL INDIAN parents :) My child does not eat .... Some tips by a Pediatrician https://youtu.be/3CyeM1Vv464 Charak Child Care

    Thursday, July 26, 2018

    Dental (Teeth & brushing) Care advice by Child Specialist


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    Dental (Teeth & brushing) Care advice by Child Specialist Dental (Teeth & brushing) Care advice by Child Specialist

    When to start brushing your child's teeth, how to brush them, and when to show to a Pediatric Dentis? Some questions answered by Dr. Gaurav Gupta, Pediatrician, Charak Clinics, Mohali https://youtu.be/BaWEbWskhJw Charak Child Care

    Saturday, July 21, 2018

    Acute attack of asthma in children - Simple tips on how to manage


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    Acute attack of asthma in children - Simple tips on how to manage Acute attack of asthma in children - Simple tips on how to manage

    How to try to manage an acute attack of asthma in your child. Suggestions by a Pediatrician. Please remember to visit your doctor / go to the Emergency room in case of a severe attack - Asthma can be very serious disease. https://youtu.be/Ehx3_C2G52Y Charak Child Care

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    Repeated Infections in small babies Repeated Infections in small babies

    My child suffers from recurrent infections, cold cough loose motions vomiting etc. many times, how can a doctor help? This question is answered by a Pediatrician, Dr. Gaurav Gupta, from Charak Clinics, Mohali, India https://youtu.be/03bHUJyOxAc Charak Child Care

    Repeated Infections in small babies


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    Thursday, July 05, 2018

    Dr Holick 17Mar2018 speaks about need for Vit D, dosage with reference to Indian adults and children


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    Dr Holick 17Mar2018 speaks about need for Vit D, dosage with reference to Indian adults and children Dr Holick 17Mar2018 speaks about need for Vit D, dosage with reference to Indian adults and children

    Dr Holick, father of Vit D research, speaks about need for Vit D, dosage with reference to Indian adults and children on 17 mar 2018 at Kolkata. Copyright is reserved with respective authors, including Abbott. This is for educational purposes for Pediatrician, Physician and other doctors. https://youtu.be/Iru2kQo-9Zw Charak Child Care

    Wednesday, June 27, 2018

    Thursday, May 24, 2018

    MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine


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    MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine

    MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine. A promotional video by Gujarat Govt - all rights are with owners, video being share for parent education https://youtu.be/0UzU7shmfQQ Charak Clinics

    Ants on Urine - peshaab mein keede Ants on Urine - peshaab mein keede

    Does your child get ants on their urine ? Is it something to worry about? https://youtu.be/Jm_KqvPGkpM Charak Clinics

    Ants on Urine - peshaab mein keede


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    Tuesday, May 22, 2018

    Monday, May 14, 2018

    Care of normal newborn - Tips from Indian Academy of Pediatrics


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    Care of normal newborn - Tips from Indian Academy of Pediatrics Care of normal newborn - Tips from Indian Academy of Pediatrics

    All rights are with Indian Academy of Pediatrics, This video is shared to help doctors and parents understand how to take the care of newborn baby just after birth. https://youtu.be/KOlE0weNtyc Charak Clinics

    Saturday, May 12, 2018

    Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination


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    Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination

    This is what should be circulated in Social Media rather than all the fake news ! Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination https://youtu.be/9hiaTiUvon8 Charak Clinics

    Monday, May 07, 2018

    MR School Vaccination Campaign in India - Important FAQs (Frequently asked questions)


    Why is a Measles Rubella vaccination campaign being conducted? 
    • The purpose of the Measles-Rubella campaign is to protect your child and eliminate transmission of Measles and Rubella from the community by vaccinating 100% target children with MR vaccine. 
    • Measles-Rubella vaccination campaign is a special campaign to vaccinate all children of 9 months to <15 additional="" age="" dose="" font="" group="" mr="" nbsp="" of="" one="" vaccine.="" with="" years="">
    • This additional campaign dose will boost the immunity of child and protect the entire community by eliminating transmission of measles and rubella. 
    • The conduct of Measles-Rubella vaccination campaigns was an important factor in achieving measles elimination in the Western Hemisphere (2002), and the elimination of indigenous rubella in 2009. 

    Is Measles-Rubella vaccine safe for my child, specially the one being used in MeaslesRubella campaign?
     • The Measles-Rubella vaccine is safe. Around 150 countries are currently using measles and rubella containing vaccines and they have proven to be highly safe and effective. 
    • Most children who get the Measles-Rubella vaccine do not have any serious problems with it. Side effects, if any, like low fever and mild rash following administration of MR vaccine are mostly mild and transient.
     • The vaccine being given in the Measles-Rubella campaign is produced in India and is WHO prequalified. The same vaccine is being given in the routine immunisation programme of India and in many countries, including neighbouring countries like Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Myanmar.  
    • Private practitioners in India have been giving Measles-Rubella or measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine to the children for many years. The Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) endorses the strategy of Measles-Rubella vaccination.  
    For the complete list of FAQs visit WHO site

    Friday, May 04, 2018

    Researchers map the potential spread of yellow fever virus to cities around the world

    Source
    IMAGE
    IMAGE: RESEARCHERS LED BY DR. KAMRAN KHAN OF ST. MICHAEL'S HAVE MAPPED THE WORLDWIDE PATHWAYS THROUGH WHICH YELLOW FEVER VIRUS COULD SPREAD BY ANALYZING GLOBAL PATTERNS OF AIRLINE TRAVELLERS, THE ENVIRONMENTAL... view more 
    CREDIT: ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
    TORONTO, April 27, 2018 - The deadly yellow fever virus has the potential to spread into cities around the world where it previously hasn't been seen, according to a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital.
    Researchers led by Dr. Kamran Khan of St. Michael's have mapped the worldwide pathways through which yellow fever virus could spread by analyzing global patterns of airline travellers, the environmental conditions needed to enable transmission of the virus within a city, and countries' requirements for travellers to provide proof of yellow fever vaccination upon entry.
    Published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, the research does not model a particular outbreak, but rather examines the potential spread for yellow fever virus to spread between the world's cities.
    "Imagine a yellow fever outbreak as a fire," said Dr. Khan, who is a scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital. "Embers can fly off in different directions, and if they land in the right place, they can create another fire. We studied the global conduits through which yellow fever virus can spread, and the potential for new yellow fever outbreaks to occur in the world's urban areas."
    The team of researchers took a global panoramic view of yellow fever virus. They separated the world into three types of places: endemic areas, places where yellow fever virus is established; areas that appear suitable for yellow fever virus transmission but where it has not yet been seen; and non-endemic areas where there is no yellow fever virus and the environment appears unsuitable for it to spread. Yellow fever is spread through the bite of an Aedes aegypti mosquito, which can also transmit viruses such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika.
    According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 15 per cent of people who get yellow fever develop serious illness that can be fatal.
    "Yellow fever vaccine is the best protection against yellow fever disease," says Dr. Martin Cetron, head of CDC's Division of Global Migration and Quarantine. "CDC urges anyone traveling to a country where yellow fever is circulating to be vaccinated against yellow fever. Yellow fever vaccine is available at a limited number of clinics in the U.S., and people with some medical conditions shouldn't be vaccinated, so travellers should plan ahead."
    Some countries have set up policies requiring international travellers to provide proof of yellow fever vaccination upon entry. Dr. Khan and his team took into account which countries require proof and which currently don't. They then analyzed the travel patterns of 1.4 billion people flying through commercial airports around the world.
    "There are different levels of risk depending on where the person is travelling to and where they are coming from," Dr. Khan said. "In today's increasingly connected world, one of the key concerns is that yellow fever virus could be carried by a traveller into a densely populated city that has the environmental conditions necessary to support its transmission, but where the virus has never been seen before. In this setting, the urban population would have essentially have no preexisting immunity to the virus."
    Through their analysis, Dr. Khan's team found that:
    • 89 per cent of travellers departing from yellow fever-endemic areas to other yellow fever-endemic areas were required to provide proof of vaccination upon entry
    • Less than 35 per cent of travellers departing yellow fever-endemic areas for cities that appear suitable for yellow fever virus transmission were required to provide proof of vaccination upon entry
    • Less than 25 per cent of travellers who departed from areas of the world where there is no yellow fever virus for areas that are endemic with yellow fever virus were required to provide proof of vaccination upon entry
    • Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Peru and the United States had the highest volumes of travellers arriving from yellow-fever endemic areas and the largest populations living in cities that appear suitable for yellow fever virus transmission
    "Now that we have a global view of how yellow fever virus can travel between the world's cities, countries can reexamine their policies to prevent the importation of yellow fever virus, protect travellers from getting infected with the virus, and in turn prevent its exportation to other parts of the world," Dr. Khan said. "We can't assume that if a yellow fever outbreak has never occurred before in a specific urban area of the world that it will never occur in the future."
    In the meantime, Dr. Khan recommends that travellers maintain awareness of the current requirements for yellow fever vaccination and that they have a thoughtful discussion with their physician about whether or not they should receive the yellow fever vaccine before they travel.
    ###
    The full paper is available online here:

    Saturday, April 28, 2018

    Study finds Miami among cities at risk of yellow fever outbreak

    GENEVA (WSVN) — A new study says Miami is at risk of a deadly yellow fever outbreak due to its tropical climate and high amount of international travelers, Reuters is reporting.
    The World Health Organization’s study points out that Miami is vulnerable because the United States has no checks on travelers coming from areas where yellow fever is regularly found.
    The disease is spread by the same mosquito that carries the Zika virus, and is found in tropical and subtropical areas of South America and Africa, according to the news agency.
    The WHO study, entitled “International Travel and the Urban Spread of Yellow Fever”, found that nearly 2.8 million people flew to the U.S. from yellow fever-affected areas in 2016. And unlike some other countries, the United States does not require travelers to show proof of vaccination for the disease.
    Researchers said about 9.5 million people live in areas like Miami and other ecologically-suitable urban areas for an outbreak. Globally, the study identified 472 cities in danger of an outbreak in 54 countries. But many of the cities, including New Delhi, Mumbai, Karachi and Manila, require travelers to provide vaccination certificates if they are arriving from endemic countries.
    Yellow fever can be deadly, with half of severe cases dying within two weeks of diagnosis, according to WHO. Symptoms include muscle pain, nausea and vomiting. About 15 percent of cases become more severe, causing patients to suffer jaundice, abdominal pain, decreased kidney function and bleeding from the mouth, nose, eyes or stomach, Reuters reports.

    Friday, April 27, 2018

    The A to Z of Yellow Fever - The Citizen, Apr 2018

    The A to Z of yellow fever

    Picture: iStock
    Picture: iStock

    The disease can result in severe illness or death if not treated properly.

    Yellow fever is a disease found in tropical and subtropical areas of Africa and South America. It is a viral infection spread by mosquitoes; it can result in illness and even death. It is called “yellow fever” because the skin turns yellow as a complication of the disease (jaundice).
    There are currently 43 countries where yellow fever has been declared a risk. Proof of vaccination for travel may be required if you are travelling to or from one of these countries, with many other countries also requiring vaccination for entry.
    In Africa: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, The Democratic Republic of Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo and Uganda.
    And in the rest of the world: South America, Argentina – Misiones Province, Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, Ecuador excluding Galapagos Islands, French Guiana, Panama, Peru, Paraguay, Trinidad and Venezuela.
    In mild cases, yellow fever causes a fever, headache, nausea and vomiting. But yellow fever can become more serious, causing heart, liver and kidney problems along with haemorrhaging. Up to 50% of people with the more-severe form of yellow fever die.
    There’s no specific treatment for yellow fever. But getting a yellow fever vaccine before travelling to an area in which the virus is known to exist can protect you from the disease. Before travel, four weeks or more before your trip, make an appointment to visit a travel clinic if you’re travelling to an area in which yellow fever is known to occur so that you discuss whether you need the yellow fever vaccine.
    If you have less than four weeks to prepare, call your doctor anyway. Ideally, you’ll be able to be vaccinated at least three to four weeks before travelling to an area where yellow fever occurs. Your travel doctor will help you determine whether you need vaccinations and can provide general guidance on protecting your health while abroad.
    Seek emergency medical care if you’ve recently travelled to a region where yellow fever is known to occur and you develop signs or symptoms of the toxic phase of the disease.
    Picture: iStock

    Symptoms

    You will not experience any symptoms within the first three to six days after you’ve contracted yellow fever. After this, the infection enters an acute phase and then, in some cases, a toxic phase that can be life-threatening.
    The symptoms in acute phase usually improve and are gone within several days.
    Acute phase
    • Fever
    • Headache
    • Muscle aches, particularly in your back and knees
    • Sensitivity to light
    • Nausea, vomiting or both
    • Loss of appetite
    • Dizziness
    • Red eyes, face or tongue
    Toxic phase
    In the toxic phase, acute signs and symptoms return and more-severe and life-threatening ones also appear. These can include:
    • Yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice)
    • Abdominal pain and vomiting, sometimes of blood
    • Decreased urination
    • Bleeding from your nose, mouth and eyes
    • Slow heart rate (bradycardia)
    • Liver and kidney failure
    • Brain dysfunction

    Causes

    It is caused by a virus that is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. These mosquitoes breed even in the cleanest water and are found near where people live.
    Humans and monkeys are most commonly infected with the yellow fever virus. Mosquitoes transmit the virus back and forth between monkeys, humans or both.
    When a mosquito bites a human or a monkey infected with yellow fever, the virus enters the mosquito’s bloodstream and circulates before settling in the salivary glands. When the infected mosquito bites another monkey or human, the virus then enters the host’s bloodstream.

    Risk factors

    You may be at risk of the disease if you travel to an area where mosquitoes continue to carry the yellow fever virus. These areas include sub-Saharan Africa and tropical South America.
    If you’re planning on travelling to these areas, you can protect yourself by getting a yellow fever vaccine at least several weeks before travelling.
    Anyone can be infected with the yellow fever virus, but older adults are at greater risk of getting seriously ill.

    Complications

    Yellow fever results in death for 20 to 50% of those who develop severe disease. Complications include kidney and liver failure, jaundice (yellow skin and eyes), delirium and coma.
    People who survive the infection recover gradually over a period of several weeks to months, usually without significant organ damage. During this time a person may experience severe fatigue and jaundice.
    Picture: iStock

    Prevention

    Vaccination
    A highly effective vaccine exists to prevent yellow fever. If you plan to travel in these areas, talk with your doctor at least 10 days, but preferably three to four weeks, before your trip begins.
    Many countries will require you to present a valid certificate of immunization before allowing you in.
    Just one dose of the yellow fever vaccine provides protection for at least 10 years. Side effects are usually mild, lasting five to 10 days, and may include headaches, low-grade fevers, muscle pain, fatigue and soreness at the site of injection.
    More significant reactions occur in infants, immunecompromised people, pregnant women and adults older than 60 years and they include developing a syndrome similar to actual yellow fever, inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) or death.
    Mosquito protection
    In addition to getting the vaccine, you can help protect yourself against yellow fever by protecting yourself against mosquitoes.
    • Use mosquito repellents, on own skin and clothing. Avoid applying any repellent on the hands of young children or on infants under two months of age. Instead, cover your infant’s stroller or playpen with mosquito netting when outside.
    • Avoid unnecessary outdoor activity when mosquitoes are most active.
    • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants when you go into mosquito-infested areas.
    • Stay in air-conditioned or well-screened housing.
    • If your accommodations don’t have good window screens or air-conditioning, it is a good idea to use bed nets. Nets that have been pre-treated with insecticide offer additional protection.

    Tips: White spot on face of children Tips: White spot on face of children

    Tips from a Child Specialist Doctor in Mohali, India for white spots on the face of your kid https://youtu.be/6MWnpEcRmmQ Charak Clinics

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    White spots on the face of children


    Saturday, February 24, 2018

    Nutrition during #Exams for students & parents in India


    Exams are approaching, students and parents alike are anxious to beat the examination stress smoothly.

    Here are few tips for Students and Parents to relieve a part of this stress-

    1. Always start your day with fruit for improving concentration in class and during exams.

    2. Never skip your breakfast, homemade breakfast like poha, daliya, upma, parantha etc. will keep you alert and productive all day though.

    3. Try and carry portable meals in your bag when going for classes-peanuts, makhane, channe, sprouts, fruits, ladoos or chikki to snack on when you get packish between lectures.

    4. When staying up to late study, have grilled sandwich or chapati with jaggery and ghee or fruit smoothie.

    5. During exams, eat foods that are familiar with. 
    Avoid chips, biscuits, processed packed products for better memory.

    6. The night before exam, opt for rice based meal- khichri, curd-rice or dal-rice-ghee is ideal to stay satisfied and keep anxiety under control.

    7.Avoiding green leafy vegetables,poha, sprouts, amla, lemon can cause iron deficiency called anaemia.

    8. Watching TV,mobile,laptop,tabs while having food interferes in absorption of good nutrients in body. Stop use of gadgets 60 mins before going to bed.

    9. Prepare healthy snacks in evening instead of junk and street food like sprouts chaat, channa chaat, panner salad, egg salad, vegetable poha etc.

    10.Opt for healthy options while eating out with friends after exam like choosing Indian cuisine instead of burgers and pizzas.

    11. Include brain foods in your diet like walnuts, almonds, coconut, flaxseeds, figs, pumpkin seeds, fruits and vegetables.

    12. Exercise 150 mins per week. Habits formed now, goes forever with you.
    Love yourself. Good luck for exams.