Thursday, May 31, 2018

Itching in Anal area in children - Why does it happen & how to treat?


via IFTTT

Itching in Anal area in children - Why does it happen & how to treat? Itching in Anal area in children - Why does it happen & how to treat?

Pediatrician discusses the reasons and management for Anal itching in Children https://youtu.be/MhrKA9RjCOg Charak Clinics

Thursday, May 24, 2018

MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine


via IFTTT

MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine

MR Vaccination CAMPAIGN HINDI Promotional Why should ALL children take this M R Vaccine. A promotional video by Gujarat Govt - all rights are with owners, video being share for parent education https://youtu.be/0UzU7shmfQQ Charak Clinics

Ants on Urine - peshaab mein keede Ants on Urine - peshaab mein keede

Does your child get ants on their urine ? Is it something to worry about? https://youtu.be/Jm_KqvPGkpM Charak Clinics

Ants on Urine - peshaab mein keede


via IFTTT

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Monday, May 14, 2018

Care of normal newborn - Tips from Indian Academy of Pediatrics


via IFTTT

Care of normal newborn - Tips from Indian Academy of Pediatrics Care of normal newborn - Tips from Indian Academy of Pediatrics

All rights are with Indian Academy of Pediatrics, This video is shared to help doctors and parents understand how to take the care of newborn baby just after birth. https://youtu.be/KOlE0weNtyc Charak Clinics

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination


via IFTTT

Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination

This is what should be circulated in Social Media rather than all the fake news ! Kids at Dashmesh Public School, Faridkot after MR vaccination https://youtu.be/9hiaTiUvon8 Charak Clinics

Monday, May 07, 2018

MR School Vaccination Campaign in India - Important FAQs (Frequently asked questions)


Why is a Measles Rubella vaccination campaign being conducted? 
• The purpose of the Measles-Rubella campaign is to protect your child and eliminate transmission of Measles and Rubella from the community by vaccinating 100% target children with MR vaccine. 
• Measles-Rubella vaccination campaign is a special campaign to vaccinate all children of 9 months to <15 additional="" age="" dose="" font="" group="" mr="" nbsp="" of="" one="" vaccine.="" with="" years="">
• This additional campaign dose will boost the immunity of child and protect the entire community by eliminating transmission of measles and rubella. 
• The conduct of Measles-Rubella vaccination campaigns was an important factor in achieving measles elimination in the Western Hemisphere (2002), and the elimination of indigenous rubella in 2009. 

Is Measles-Rubella vaccine safe for my child, specially the one being used in MeaslesRubella campaign?
 • The Measles-Rubella vaccine is safe. Around 150 countries are currently using measles and rubella containing vaccines and they have proven to be highly safe and effective. 
• Most children who get the Measles-Rubella vaccine do not have any serious problems with it. Side effects, if any, like low fever and mild rash following administration of MR vaccine are mostly mild and transient.
 • The vaccine being given in the Measles-Rubella campaign is produced in India and is WHO prequalified. The same vaccine is being given in the routine immunisation programme of India and in many countries, including neighbouring countries like Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Myanmar.  
• Private practitioners in India have been giving Measles-Rubella or measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine to the children for many years. The Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) endorses the strategy of Measles-Rubella vaccination.  
For the complete list of FAQs visit WHO site

Friday, May 04, 2018

Researchers map the potential spread of yellow fever virus to cities around the world

Source
IMAGE
IMAGE: RESEARCHERS LED BY DR. KAMRAN KHAN OF ST. MICHAEL'S HAVE MAPPED THE WORLDWIDE PATHWAYS THROUGH WHICH YELLOW FEVER VIRUS COULD SPREAD BY ANALYZING GLOBAL PATTERNS OF AIRLINE TRAVELLERS, THE ENVIRONMENTAL... view more 
CREDIT: ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
TORONTO, April 27, 2018 - The deadly yellow fever virus has the potential to spread into cities around the world where it previously hasn't been seen, according to a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital.
Researchers led by Dr. Kamran Khan of St. Michael's have mapped the worldwide pathways through which yellow fever virus could spread by analyzing global patterns of airline travellers, the environmental conditions needed to enable transmission of the virus within a city, and countries' requirements for travellers to provide proof of yellow fever vaccination upon entry.
Published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, the research does not model a particular outbreak, but rather examines the potential spread for yellow fever virus to spread between the world's cities.
"Imagine a yellow fever outbreak as a fire," said Dr. Khan, who is a scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital. "Embers can fly off in different directions, and if they land in the right place, they can create another fire. We studied the global conduits through which yellow fever virus can spread, and the potential for new yellow fever outbreaks to occur in the world's urban areas."
The team of researchers took a global panoramic view of yellow fever virus. They separated the world into three types of places: endemic areas, places where yellow fever virus is established; areas that appear suitable for yellow fever virus transmission but where it has not yet been seen; and non-endemic areas where there is no yellow fever virus and the environment appears unsuitable for it to spread. Yellow fever is spread through the bite of an Aedes aegypti mosquito, which can also transmit viruses such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika.
According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 15 per cent of people who get yellow fever develop serious illness that can be fatal.
"Yellow fever vaccine is the best protection against yellow fever disease," says Dr. Martin Cetron, head of CDC's Division of Global Migration and Quarantine. "CDC urges anyone traveling to a country where yellow fever is circulating to be vaccinated against yellow fever. Yellow fever vaccine is available at a limited number of clinics in the U.S., and people with some medical conditions shouldn't be vaccinated, so travellers should plan ahead."
Some countries have set up policies requiring international travellers to provide proof of yellow fever vaccination upon entry. Dr. Khan and his team took into account which countries require proof and which currently don't. They then analyzed the travel patterns of 1.4 billion people flying through commercial airports around the world.
"There are different levels of risk depending on where the person is travelling to and where they are coming from," Dr. Khan said. "In today's increasingly connected world, one of the key concerns is that yellow fever virus could be carried by a traveller into a densely populated city that has the environmental conditions necessary to support its transmission, but where the virus has never been seen before. In this setting, the urban population would have essentially have no preexisting immunity to the virus."
Through their analysis, Dr. Khan's team found that:
  • 89 per cent of travellers departing from yellow fever-endemic areas to other yellow fever-endemic areas were required to provide proof of vaccination upon entry
  • Less than 35 per cent of travellers departing yellow fever-endemic areas for cities that appear suitable for yellow fever virus transmission were required to provide proof of vaccination upon entry
  • Less than 25 per cent of travellers who departed from areas of the world where there is no yellow fever virus for areas that are endemic with yellow fever virus were required to provide proof of vaccination upon entry
  • Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Peru and the United States had the highest volumes of travellers arriving from yellow-fever endemic areas and the largest populations living in cities that appear suitable for yellow fever virus transmission
"Now that we have a global view of how yellow fever virus can travel between the world's cities, countries can reexamine their policies to prevent the importation of yellow fever virus, protect travellers from getting infected with the virus, and in turn prevent its exportation to other parts of the world," Dr. Khan said. "We can't assume that if a yellow fever outbreak has never occurred before in a specific urban area of the world that it will never occur in the future."
In the meantime, Dr. Khan recommends that travellers maintain awareness of the current requirements for yellow fever vaccination and that they have a thoughtful discussion with their physician about whether or not they should receive the yellow fever vaccine before they travel.
###
The full paper is available online here: